draft-ietf-6man-enhanced-dad-09.txt   draft-ietf-6man-enhanced-dad-10.txt 
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Updates: 4862, 4861, 3971 (if approved) W. Beebee Updates: 4862, 4861, 3971 (if approved) W. Beebee
Intended status: Standards Track C. Pignataro Intended status: Standards Track C. Pignataro
Expires: May 17, 2015 Cisco Systems, Inc. Expires: May 17, 2015 Cisco Systems, Inc.
E. Dart E. Dart
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
W. George W. George
Time Warner Cable Time Warner Cable
November 13, 2014 November 13, 2014
Enhanced Duplicate Address Detection Enhanced Duplicate Address Detection
draft-ietf-6man-enhanced-dad-09 draft-ietf-6man-enhanced-dad-10
Abstract Abstract
IPv6 Loopback Suppression and Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) are IPv6 Loopback Suppression and Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) are
discussed in Appendix A of RFC4862. That specification mentions a discussed in Appendix A of RFC4862. That specification mentions a
hardware-assisted mechanism to detect looped back DAD messages. If hardware-assisted mechanism to detect looped back DAD messages. If
hardware cannot suppress looped back DAD messages, a software hardware cannot suppress looped back DAD messages, a software
solution is required. Several service provider communities have solution is required. Several service provider communities have
expressed a need for automated detection of looped backed Neighbor expressed a need for automated detection of looped backed Neighbor
Discovery (ND) messages used by DAD. This document includes Discovery (ND) messages used by DAD. This document includes
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o Looped back message - also referred to as a reflected message. o Looped back message - also referred to as a reflected message.
The message sent by the sender is received by the sender due to The message sent by the sender is received by the sender due to
the network or an Upper Layer Protocol on the sender looping the the network or an Upper Layer Protocol on the sender looping the
message back. message back.
o Loopback - A function in which the router's layer-3 interface (or o Loopback - A function in which the router's layer-3 interface (or
the circuit to which the router's interface is connected) is the circuit to which the router's interface is connected) is
looped back or connected to itself. Loopback causes packets sent looped back or connected to itself. Loopback causes packets sent
by the interface to be received by the interface and results in by the interface to be received by the interface and results in
interface unavailability for regular data traffic forwarding. See interface unavailability for regular data traffic forwarding. See
more details in section 9.1 of [RFC2178]. The Loopback function more details in section 9.1 of [RFC2328]. The Loopback function
is commonly used in an interface context to gain information on is commonly used in an interface context to gain information on
the quality of the interface, by employing mechanisms such as the quality of the interface, by employing mechanisms such as
ICMPv6 pings and bit-error tests. In a circuit context, this ICMPv6 pings and bit-error tests. In a circuit context, this
function is used in wide area environments including optical Dense function is used in wide area environments including optical Dense
Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and SONET/SDH for fault Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and SONET/SDH for fault
isolation (e.g. by placing a loopback at different geographic isolation (e.g. by placing a loopback at different geographic
locations along the path of a wide area circuit to help locate a locations along the path of a wide area circuit to help locate a
circuit fault). The Loopback function may be employed locally or circuit fault). The Loopback function may be employed locally or
remotely. remotely.
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describing the use cases. describing the use cases.
9. Normative References 9. Normative References
[RFC1661] Simpson, W., "The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)", STD 51, [RFC1661] Simpson, W., "The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)", STD 51,
RFC 1661, July 1994. RFC 1661, July 1994.
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
[RFC2178] Moy, J., "OSPF Version 2", RFC 2178, July 1997. [RFC2328] Moy, J., "OSPF Version 2", STD 54, RFC 2328, April 1998.
[RFC3971] Arkko, J., Kempf, J., Zill, B., and P. Nikander, "SEcure [RFC3971] Arkko, J., Kempf, J., Zill, B., and P. Nikander, "SEcure
Neighbor Discovery (SEND)", RFC 3971, March 2005. Neighbor Discovery (SEND)", RFC 3971, March 2005.
[RFC4429] Moore, N., "Optimistic Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) [RFC4429] Moore, N., "Optimistic Duplicate Address Detection (DAD)
for IPv6", RFC 4429, April 2006. for IPv6", RFC 4429, April 2006.
[RFC4861] Narten, T., Nordmark, E., Simpson, W., and H. Soliman, [RFC4861] Narten, T., Nordmark, E., Simpson, W., and H. Soliman,
"Neighbor Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 4861, "Neighbor Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 4861,
September 2007. September 2007.
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