[Docs] [txt|pdf] [Tracker] [Email] [Diff1] [Diff2] [Nits]

Versions: 00 01 02 03 04 05 06

Common Control and Measurment Plane                           I. Hussain
Internet-Draft                                               R. Valiveti
Intended status: Informational                             Infinera Corp
Expires: May 11, 2019                                            Q. Wang
                                                                     ZTE
                                                            L. Andersson
                                                                 M. Chen
                                                                H. Zheng
                                                                  Huawei
                                                        November 7, 2018


  GMPLS Routing and Signaling Framework for Flexible Ethernet (FlexE)
                      draft-izh-ccamp-flexe-fwk-06

Abstract

   This document specifies GMPLS control plane requirements, framework,
   and architecture for FlexE technology.

   As different from earlier Ethernet data planes FlexE allows for
   decoupling of the Ethernet Physical layer (PHY) and Media Access
   Control layer (MAC) rates.

   Study Group 15 (SG15) of the ITU-T has endorsed the FlexE
   Implementation Agreement from Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) and
   included it, by reference, in some of their Recommendations.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 11, 2019.







Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 1]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  FlexE Reference Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  GMPLS Controlled FlexE  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.1.  Types of LSPs in a FlexE capable network  . . . . . . . .   8
     5.2.  Signaling Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.3.  MPLS LSP in the FlexE Data Plane  . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.4.  Configuring the data plane in FlexE capable nodes . . . .  10
       5.4.1.  Configure/Establish a FlexE Group/Link  . . . . . . .  10
       5.4.2.  Configure/Establish a FlexE Client  . . . . . . . . .  11
       5.4.3.  Advertise FlexE Groups and FlexE lts  . . . . . . . .  11
     5.5.  Open Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
       5.5.1.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-1 (MLCP-1)  . . . . . .  12
       5.5.2.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-2 (MLCP-2)  . . . . . .  12
       5.5.3.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-12 (MLCP-12)  . . . . .  12
       5.5.4.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-3 (MLCP-3)  . . . . . .  13
   6.  Framework and Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.1.  FlexE Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.2.  FlexE Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
       6.2.1.  Architecture Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
       6.2.2.  FlexE Layer Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
         6.2.2.1.  FlexE Group structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
         6.2.2.2.  FlexE Client mapping  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   7.  Control Plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     7.1.  GMPLS Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     7.2.  GMPLS Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
       7.2.1.  LSP setup with pre-configured FlexE infrastructure  .  17
       7.2.2.  LSP setup with partially configured FlexE
               infrastructure  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 2]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


       7.2.3.  LSP setup with non-configured FlexE infrastructure  .  18
       7.2.4.  Packet Label Switching Data Plane . . . . . . . . . .  18
   8.  Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) . . . . . .  20
   9.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   10. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   11. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   12. Contributors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   13. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     13.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     13.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22

1.  Introduction

   Ethernet MAC rates were until recently constrained to match the rates
   of the Ethernet PHY(s).  Work within the OIF allows MAC rates to be
   different from PHY rates.  An OIF implementation agreement
   [OIFFLEXE1] allows for complete decoupling of the MAC and PHY rates.

   SG15 in ITU-T has endorsed the OIF FlexE data plane and parts of
   [G.872], [G.709], [G.798] and [G.8021] depends on or are based on the
   FlexE data plane.

   This includes support for:

   a.  MAC rates which are greater than the rate of a single PHY;
       multiple PHYs are bonded to achieve this

   b.  MAC rates which are less than the rate of a PHY (sub-rate)

   c.  support for channelization within a single PHY, or over a group
       of bonded PHYs.

   The capabilities supported by the first version of the FlexE data
   plane are:

   a.  Support a large rate Ethernet MAC over bonded Ethernet PHYs, e.g.
       supporting a 200G MAC over 2 bonded 100GBASE-R PHY(s)

   b.  Support a sub-rate Ethernet MAC over a single Ethernet PHY, e.g.
       supporting a 50G MAC over a 100GBASE-R PHY

   c.  Support a collection of flexible Ethernet clients over a single
       Ethernet PHY, e.g. supporting two MACs with the rates 25G, and
       one with rate 50G over a single 100GBASE-R PHY

   d.  Support a sub-rate Ethernet MAC over bonded PHYs, e.g. supporting
       a 150G Ethernet client over 2 bonded 100GBASE-R PHY(s)



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 3]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   e.  Support a collection of Ethernet MAC clients over bonded Ethernet
       PHYs, e.g. supporting a 50G, and 150G MAC over 2 bonded Ethernet
       PHY(s)

   Networks which support FlexE Ethernet interfaces include a basic
   building block, this is true also when the interfaces are bonded.
   This building block consists of two FlexE Shim functions, located at
   opposite ends of a link, and the logical point to point links that
   carry the Ethernet PHY signals between the two FlexE Shim Functions.

   These logical point-to-point links may be realized in a variety of
   ways:

   a.  direct point-to-point links with no intervening transport
       network.

   b.  Ethernet PHY(s) may be transparently transported via an Optical
       Transport Network (OTN), as defined by ITU-T in [G.709] and
       [G.798].  The OTN set of client mappings has been extended to
       support the use cases identified in the OIF FlexE implementation
       agreement.

   This draft considers the variants in which the two peer FlexE devices
   are both customer-edge devices, or when one is a customer-edge and
   the other is provider edge devices.  This list of use cases will help
   identify the Control Plane (i.e.  Routing and Signaling) extensions
   that may be required.

1.1.  Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

2.  Terminology

   a.  CE (Customer Edge) - the group of functions that support the
       termination/origination of data received from or sent to the
       network

   b.  Ethernet PHY: an entity representing Physical Coding Sublayer
       (PCS), Physical Media Attachment (PMA), and Physical Media
       Dependent (PMD) layers.

   c.  FlexE Calendar: The total capacity of a FlexE Group is
       represented as a collection of slots which have a granularity of
       5G.  The calendar for a FlexE Group composed of n 100G PHYs is
       represented as an array of 20n slots (each representing 5G of



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 4]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


       bandwidth).  This calendar is partitioned into sub-calendars,
       with 20 slots per 100G PHY.  Each FlexE client is mapped into one
       or more calendar slots (based on the bandwidth the FlexE client
       flow will need).

   d.  FlexE Client: An Ethernet flow based on a MAC data rate that may
       or may not correspond to any Ethernet PHY rate.

   e.  FlexE Group: A FlexE Group is composed of from 1 to n Ethernet
       PHYs.  In the first version of FlexE each PHY is identified by a
       number in the range {1-254}.

   f.  FlexE Shim: the layer that maps or demaps the FlexE client flows
       carried over a FlexE Group.

   g.  LMP: Link Management Protocol

   h.  LSP: Label Switched Path

   i.  OTN: Optical Transport Network

   j.  SG15: ITU-T Study Group 15 (Transport, Access and Home).

   k.  TE: Traffic Engineering

   l.  TED: Traffic Engineering Database

3.  FlexE Reference Model

   The figure below gives a simplified FlexE reference model.





















Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 5]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


                           ...................................
                  n x PHY  .         n x crunched PHYs        .
                           .                                  .
         +----+            . +-----+    +-----+    +-----+    .   +----+
         | CE +--------------+ PE1 +----+  P  +----+ PE2 +--------+ CE |
         +----+            . +-----+    +-----+    +-----+    .   +----+
                           .                                  .
         +----+   m x PHY  .                                  .   +----+
         | CE +---------------------------------------------------+ CE |
         +----+            .                                  .   +----+
                           .         OTN Network              .
                           .                                  .
                           ....................................

         +----+   p x PHY                                         +----+
         | CE +---------------------------------------------------+ CE |
         +----+                                                   +----+





                      Figure 1: FlexE Reference Model

   The services offered by Flexible Ethernet are essentially the same as
   for traditional Ethernet, connection less Ethernet transport.
   However, when the relationship between the PHY and MAC layer are
   setup by a GMPLS control plane there is a strong connection oriented
   aspect.

4.  Requirements

   This section summarizes the control plane requirements for FlexE
   Group and FlexE Client signaling and routing.

   Req-1   The solution SHALL support the creation of a FlexE Group,
           consisting of one or more (i.e., in the 1 to 254 range) 100GE
           Ethernet PHY(s).

           There are several alternatives that can meet this
           requirement, e.g.  routing and signaling protocols, or a
           centralized controller/management system with network access
           to the FlexE mux/demux at each FlexE Group termination point.

   Req-2   The solution SHOULD be able to verify that the collection of
           Ethernet PHY(s) included in a FlexE Group have the same
           characteristics (e.g.  number of PHYs, rate of PHYs, etc.) at
           the peer FlexE shims.



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 6]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   Req-3   The solution SHALL support the ability to delete a FlexE
           Group.

   Req-4   The solution SHALL support the ability to administratively
           lock/unlock a FlexE Group.

   Req-5   It SHALL be possible to add/remove PHY(s) to/from an
           operational FlexE group while the group has been
           administratively locked.

   Req-6   The solution SHALL support the ability to advertise and
           discover information about FlexE capable nodes, and the FlexE
           Groups and FlexE Clients they support.

   Req-7   The system SHALL allow the addition (or removal) of one or
           more FlexE clients on aFlexE Group.  The addition (or
           removal) of a FlexE client flow SHALL NOT affect the services
           for the other FlexE client signals.

   Req-8   The system SHALL allow the FlexE client signals to flexibly
           span the set of Ethernet PHY(s) which comprise the FlexE
           Group.

   Req-9   The solution SHALL support FlexE client flow resizing without
           affecting any existing FlexE clients within the same FlexE
           Group.

   Req-10  The solution SHALL support establishment of MPLS LSPs that
           requires the support of a FlexE infrastructure.

5.  GMPLS Controlled FlexE

   The high level goals for using a GMPLS control plane for FlexE can be
   summarized as:

   o  Set up a FlexE Group

   o  Set up a FlexE Client

   o  Advertise FlexE Groups and FlexE Clients

   o  Set up of a higher layer LSP that requires to be run over a FlexE
      infrastructure.








Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 7]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


5.1.  Types of LSPs in a FlexE capable network

   The FlexE infrastructure may be established in three different ways

   o  The FlexE Groups and FlexE Client may be pre-configured

   o  Only the FlexE groups may be pre-configured, while the setup of
      the FlexE client is triggered by the request to setup a MPLS LSP

   o  The setup of both FlexE Group and FlexE Client may be triggered by
      the request to setup an MPLS LSP.

5.2.  Signaling Channel

   In the type of equipment for which FlexE was first specified an out
   of band signaling channel is not commonly available.  If that is the
   case, and the GMPLS FlexE control plane will be used, the FlexE Group
   will have to setup by e.g. a management system and a FlexE Client on
   that FlexE Group (also configured) will have to allocated as a
   signaling channel.

   Further details of the setup of the FlexE Groups, FlexE Clients and
   MPLS LSPs over a FlexE infrastructure will be found in Section 7.2.

5.3.  MPLS LSP in the FlexE Data Plane

   FlexE is a true link layer technology, i.e. it is not switched, this
   means that the FlexE Groups and FlexE Clients are terminated on the
   next-hop node, and that the switching needs to take place on a higher
   layer.

   The FlexE technology can be used to establish link layer connectivity
   with high and deterministic bandwidth.  However, there is no way to,
   in a deterministic way, allocate certain traffic to a specific FlexE
   Client.  A GMPLS control plane can do this.

   A GMPLS controlled FlexE capable node may be thought of using the
   traditional model of a node with a separation between control and
   data plane.












Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 8]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


                         +------------------+
                         |  +------------+  |
                         |  |   GMPLS    |  |
                         |  |  Control   |  |
                         |  |   Plane    |  |
                         |  +------------+  |
                         |         ^        |
                         |         |        |
                         |         v        |
                         |  +------------+  |
                         |  |   FlexE    |  |
                         |  |    Data    |  |   ^
                         |  |   Plane    |  |
                         |  +------------+  |
                         +------------------+


                   Figure 2: GMPLS controlled FlexE Node

   The GMPLS control plane will speak extended standard GMPLS protocols
   with its neighbours and peers.



               Node A                  Node B                  Node Z
             +--CP
           +-|-----------+        |------------------+  ~   +---------+
           | |           |        |                  |      |         |
           | |  +------+ |        | +--------------+ |      | +-----+ |
     LSP   | +->|  v   | |        | |  ....x.....  | |      | |  ^  | |
           | |  |  .   | |        | |  .        .  | |      | |  .  | |
           | |  +--.---+ |        | +--.--------.--+ |      | +--.--+ |
    FlexE  | +->|  o   | |        | |  o  |  |  o  | |      | |  o  | |
    Client | |  |  o   | |        | |  o  |  |  o  | |      | |  o  | |
           | |  +--o---| |        | +--o--+  +--o--+ |      | +--o--| |
    FlexE  | +->|  U   | |        | |  U  |  |  U  | |      | |  U  | |
    Group  |    |  U   | |        | |  U  |  |  U  | |      | |  U  | |
           |    +--U---| |        | +--U--+  +--U--+ |      | +--U--+ |
           |-------U-----+        +----U--------U----+      +----U----+
                   U                   U        U                U
                   UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU        UUUUUUU ~ UUUUUUUU

                   Legend ... = LSP
                          ooo = FlexE Client
                          UUU = FlexE Group


       Figure 3: GMPLS controlled network with FlexE infrastructure



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                  [Page 9]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   Figure 3 describes how an MPLS LSP is mapped over a FlexE Client and
   FlexE Group.

5.4.  Configuring the data plane in FlexE capable nodes

   In Figure 3 we show an LSP, a FlexE Client and a FlexE Group, the LSP
   is there because while the FlexE Channel and Group are not switched,
   switching in our example takes place on the LSP level.  This section
   will discuss establishment of FlexE Clients and Groups, and mapping
   of the LSP onto a FlexE Client.

   The establishment of a LSP over a FlexE system is very similar to how
   this is done in any other system.  Building on information gathered
   through the routing system and using the GMPLS signaling to establish
   the LSP.

5.4.1.  Configure/Establish a FlexE Group/Link

   Consider the setup of a FlexE Group between node A and B,
   corresponding to the row of U's from node A to B in Figure 3.  The
   FlexE group is considered to consist of n PHYs, but does not have any
   FlexE Clients defined from start.

   When this is done by the GMPLS control plane, two conditions need to
   be fulfilled (1) there need to be a data channel defined between node
   A and B; and (2) a FlexE capable IGP-TE protocol needs to be running
   in the network.

   Node A will send an RSVP-TE message to node be with the information
   describing the FlexE Group to be setup.  This information might be
   thought of as the "FlexE Group Label" (or part of the FlexE label).
   It will contain at least the following information:

   o  A FlexE Group Identifier (FGid).

   o  The number of active FlexE Channels (numFC), where 0 indicates
      that zero clients are active.

   o  Number of PHYs that the FlexE Group is composed of, for each PHY

      *  PHY identifier

      *  PHY bandwidth

      *  slot granularity/number of slots

      *  available and unavailable slots




Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 10]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   When node B receives the RSVP-TE message it checks that it can setup
   the requested FlexE Group.  If the check turns positive, node send an
   acknowledgment to node A and the FlexE Group is setup.

   A more detailed description of how to setup a FlexE Group, will be
   included in the draft dealing with signaling in detail.

5.4.2.  Configure/Establish a FlexE Client

   Consider the situation where a FlexE Group is already established (as
   described in Section 5.4.1) and an m G FlexE Client is needed.
   Similar to the establishment of the FlexE Group, node A will send a
   RSV-TE message to node B.

   This RSVP-TE message include at least the following information:

   o  FlexE Group Identifier

   o  FlexE Client Identifier

   o  from which PHYs the slots will allocated, i.e. slots might come
      from more than one PHY.

   o  Information per PHY

      *  PHY bandwidth

      *  slot granularity

      *  available/unavailable slots

      *  allocated slots

   A more detailed description of how to setup a FlexE Channel, will be
   included in the draft dealing with signaling in detail.

5.4.3.  Advertise FlexE Groups and FlexE lts

   Once the FlexE Group and FlexE CLielts are configured they can be
   advertised into the routing system as normal routing adjacencies,
   including the FlexE specific TE information.

5.5.  Open Issues

   Note: This section is intended to be removed and the results of the
   discussion are supposed to brought into the relevant sections of this
   document.
   The intention is to trigger this discussion.



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 11]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   While working on the FlexE Control Plane, questions around the
   relationship of entities as "control plane / multi-layer control
   plane", RSVP-TE session and the information relating to a layer
   network.  The table below summarizxes the possibilities we see.

   +-----------+---------------------+---------------------------------+
   | Control   | Session             | Network layer info              |
   | Plane     |                     |                                 |
   +-----------+---------------------+---------------------------------+
   | MLCP-1    | One session         | Info for all network layers     |
   | MLCP-2    | Sesion for each     | Each session have info for one  |
   |           | network layer       | network layer                   |
   | MLCP-12   | More than one       | info for each network layer     |
   |           | sesion              | included in the session         |
   | MLCP-3    | One sesion          | info for a single network layer |
   +-----------+---------------------+---------------------------------+

                       Table 1: Multi-layer CP types

   Sections Section 5.5.1 to Section 5.5.4 shortly describes the
   different types of control plane identified.

5.5.1.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-1 (MLCP-1)

   A multi layer control plane type 1 (MLCP-1) has one single control
   plane that that controls all layer networks that two nodes interact
   over.  The control plane sets up one single RSVP-TE session and all
   layer networks are controlled over that single session.  For each
   layer network there is a set of information that the control plane
   manages over that session.

5.5.2.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-2 (MLCP-2)

   A multi layer control plane type 2 (MLCP-2) has one single control
   plane that that controls all layer networks that two nodes interact
   over.  The control plane sets up one RSVP-TE session for each layer
   network and the layer networks are controlled over a dedicated
   session.  For each layer network there is a set of information that
   the control plane manages over the dedicated session.

5.5.3.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-12 (MLCP-12)

   A multi layer control plane type 12 (MLCP-12) is a mix between MLCP-1
   and MLCP-2, the control plane still controls all layer networks that
   two nodes interact over.  However, for some layer networks it set up
   a RSVP-TE session the may control more than one layer network.  For
   other layer network an RSCP-TE session is used to control a single




Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 12]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   layer network.  For each layer network there is a set of information
   that the control plane manages over dedicated sessions.

5.5.4.  Multi Layer Control Plane Typ-3 (MLCP-3)

   A multi layer control plane type 3 (MLCP-3) may be viewed as a set of
   confederated control plsnes, where each control plane controls one
   layer network, via a RSVP-TE session.  For each layer network there
   is a set of information that the control plane manages over the
   dedicated session.  For the case that there are more than one layer
   network between two nodes that needs to controlled, there is one
   dedicated control plane for each layer network.

6.  Framework and Architecture

   This section discusses FlexE framework and architecture.  Framework
   is taken to mean how FlexE interoperates with other parts of the data
   communication system.  Architecture is taken to mean how functional
   groups and elements within FlexE work together to deliver the
   expected FlexE services.  Framework is taken to mean how FlexE
   interacts with it environment.

6.1.  FlexE Framework

   The service offered by Flexible Ethernet is a transport service very
   similar (or even identical) to the service offered by Ethernet.

   There are two major additions supported by FlexE:

   o  FlexE is intended to support high bandwidth and FlexE can offer
      granular bandwidth from 5Gbits/s and a bandwidth as high as the
      FlexE Group allows.

   o  As FlexE groups and clients are setup as a configuration activity,
      by a centralized controller or by a GMPLS control plane the
      service is connection oriented.

6.2.  FlexE Architecture

6.2.1.  Architecture Components

   This section discusses the different parts of FlexE signaling and
   routing and how these parts interoperate.

   The FlexE routing mechanism is used to provide resource available
   information for setup of higher layer LSPs, like Ethernet PHYs'
   information, partial-rate support information.  Based on the resource
   available information advertised by routing protocol, an end-to-end



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 13]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   FlexE connection is computed, and then the signaling protocol is used
   to set up the end-to-end connection.

   FlexE signaling mechanism is used to setup LSPs.

   MPLS forwarding over a FlexE infrastructure is different from
   forwarding over other infrastructures.  When MPLS runs over a FlexE
   infrastructure it is possible that there are more than FlexE Client
   that meet the next-hop requirements, often it is possible to use any
   suitable FlexE Clientfor a hop between two nodes.  If the mapping
   between a MPLS encapsulated packet and the FlexE Client, this mapping
   need to be explicit when the LSP is set up, and the MPLS label will
   be used to find the correct FlexE Client.

6.2.2.  FlexE Layer Model

   The FLexE layer model is similar Ethernet model, the Ethernet PHY
   layer corresponds to the "FlexE Group", and the MAC layer corresponds
   to the "FlexE Client".

   As different from earlier Ethernet the combination of Flexe Group and
   Client allows for a huge freedom when it comes to define the
   bandwidth of an Ethernet connectivity.

6.2.2.1.  FlexE Group structure

   The FlexE Group might be supported by virtually any transport
   network, including the Ethernet PHY.  While the Ethernet PHY offers a
   fixed bandwidth the FlexE Group has been structured into 5 Gbit/s
   slots.  This means that the FlexE Group can support FlexE clients of
   a variety of bandwidths.

   The first version is defined for 20 slots of 5 Git/s over a 100 Gbit/
   s PHY.  The 100 Gbit/s PHYs can be bonded to give higher bandwidth.

6.2.2.2.  FlexE Client mapping

   A FlexE client is an Ethernet flow based on a MAC data rate that may
   or may not correspond to any Ethernet PHY rate.  The FlexE Shim is
   the layer that maps or demaps the FlexE client flows carried over a
   FlexE group.  As defined in [OIFFLEXE1], MAC rates of 10, 40, and any
   multiple of 25 Gbit/s are supported.  This means that if there is a
   100 Gbit/s FlexE Group between A and B, a FlexE client of 10, 25, 40,
   50, 75 and 100 Gbit/s can be created.

   However, by bonding, for example 5 PHYs of 100 Git/s to a single
   FlexE group, FlexE clients of 500 Gbit/s can be supported.




Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 14]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


7.  Control Plane

   This section discusses the procedures and extensions needed to the
   GMPLS Control Plane to establish FlexE LSPs.

   There are several ways to establish FlexE groups, allocate slots for
   FlexE clients, and setup higher layer LSPs.  A configuration tool, a
   centralized controller or the GMPLS control plane can all be used.

   To create the FlexE GMPLS control plane Groups, FlexE Clients and
   higher layer LSPs, extensions to the following protocols may be
   needed:

   o  "RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels" (RSVP-TE) [RFC3209]

   o  "Link Management Protocol" (LMP) [RFC4204]

   o  "Path Computation Element (PCE) Communication Protocol" (PCEP)
      [RFC5440]

   o  IS-IS Extensions for Traffic Engineering (ISIS-TE) [RFC5305]

   o  "OSPF Extensions in Support of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label
      Switching (GMPLS)" (OSPF-TE) [RFC4203]

   o  "North-Bound Distribution of Link-State and Traffic Engineering
      (TE) Information Using BGP" (BGP-LS) [RFC7752]

   A FlexE control plane YANG model will also be needed.

   Section 7.2 and Section 7.1 discusses the role of the GMPLS control
   plane when primarily setting up LSPs.

   When discussing the signaling and routing procedures we assume that
   the FlexE group has been established prior to executing the
   procedures needed to establish an LSP.  Technically it is possible to
   establish FlexE group, allocate FlexE client slots and LSP with a
   single exchange of GMPLS signaling messages.

7.1.  GMPLS Routing

   To establish an LSP the Traffic Engineering (TE) information is the
   most critical information, e.g. resource utilization on interfaces
   and link, including the availability of slots on the FlexE groups.
   The GPMPLS routing protocols needs to be extended to handle this
   information.  The Traffic Engineering Database (TED) will keep an
   updated version of this information.




Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 15]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   The FlexE capable nodes will be identified by IP-addresses, and the
   routing and traffic engineering information will be flooded to all
   nodes within the routing domain using TCP/IP.

   When an LSP over the FlexE infrastructure is about to be setup, e.g.
   R1 - R4 - R5 in Figure 4 the information in the TED is used verify
   that resources are available.  When it is conformed that the LSP is
   established the TED is updated, marking the resources used for the
   new LSP as used.  Similarly when a LSP is taken down the resources
   are marked as free.

7.2.  GMPLS Signaling

   As described in Section 5 the state of the FlexE infrastructure may
   effect the actions needed to setup an LSPin a FlexE capable network.
   The FlexE infrastructure maybe be:

   1.  fully pre-configured

   2.  partially pre-configured, i.e. the FlexE Group may be pre-
       configured, but not the FlexE Clients

   3.  not pre-configured, i.e. the setup of FlexE Group and FlexE
       Client will be triggered because of the request to setup an LSP.

   Figure 4 will be used to illustrate the different cases.



         +----+
         | R1 +---------------------+
         +----+                     |
                                    |
         +----+                  +--+--+                         +----+
         | R2 +------------------+  R4 +-------------------------+ R5 |
         +----+                  +--+--+                         +----+
                                    |
         +----+                     |
         | R3 +---------------------+   PHY R1 to R4 100 Gbit(s
         +----+                         PHY R2 to R4 100 Gbit(s
                                        PHY R3 to R4 100 Gbit(s
                                        PHY R4 to R5 200 Gbit(s





                        Figure 4: FlexE LSP Example



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 16]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   The text in Section 7.2 is not a specification of the GMPLS signaling
   extensions for FlexE capable network, it is a description to
   illustrate the expected features of such a protocol.  Nor do we
   discuss failure scenarios.

7.2.1.  LSP setup with pre-configured FlexE infrastructure

   In this first example, referencing Figure 4, one 100 Gbit/s FlexE
   group is configured between R1 and R4, between R2 and R4, and between
   R3 and R4.  Between R4 and R5 there is a 200 Gbit/s FlexE Group.

   Over each 100 Gbit/s FlexE Group there are four 5 Gbit/s, two 20
   Gbit/s and one 40 Gbit/s FlrxE Clients configured.  Over the 200 Git/
   s FlexE Group there are eoght 5 Gbit/s, four 20 Gbit/s and tow 40
   Gbit/s FlrxE Clients configured.

   One of the 5 Gbit/s FlexE Clients on each FlexE Groups are used as
   signaling channel.

   To establish the for example a 200 Mbit/s MPLS LSP the normal GMPLS
   request/response procedures are followed.  R1 sends the request to
   R4, R4 allocate resources on one of the FlexE Ckients, forward the
   request to R5.  R5 responds to R4 indicating the label and the FlexE
   Client the traffic should be sent over, R4 does the same for R1.

   The only difference between the standard signaling and what happens
   here is that there the assigned label will be used to find the right
   FlexE Client.

7.2.2.  LSP setup with partially configured FlexE infrastructure

   In the second example, also referencing Figure 4, the FlexE Groups
   are set up in the same way as in the first example, however only one
   5 Gbit/s FlexE Client per FlexE Group are established by
   configuration.  This FlexE Client will be used for signaling.

   When preparing to send the request that a 5 Gbit/s MPLS LSP shall be
   set up R1 discovers that there are no feasible FlexE Client between
   R1 aand R4.  R1 therefore sends the request to establish such a FlexE
   Client, when receiving the request R4 allocates resources for the
   FlexE Client on the FlexE Group.  There may be different strategies
   for allocating the bandwidth for this FlexE client.  Such strategies
   are out of scope for this document.  R1 then sends the information
   about the FlexE Client to R1, and both ends establish the FlexE
   Client.

   When the FlexE Client between R1 and R4 is established, R1 proceeds
   to send the request for an MPLS LSP to R4.  R4 will discover that a



Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 17]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   feasible FlexE Client is missing between R4 and R5.  The same
   procedure s for setting up the FlexE Client between R1 and R4 is
   repeated for R4 and R5.  When there is a feasible FlexE Client
   available the signaling to set up the MPLS LSP continues as normal.

   The label allocated for the MPLS LSP will be used to find the correct
   FlexE Client.

   When a FlexE Clients is set up in this way they can be announced into
   the routing system in two different ways.  First, they can be made
   generally available, i.e. it will be free to use for anyone that want
   to set up LSPs over the FlexE Group between R1 and R4 and between R4
   and R5.  Second, the use of the FlexE Clients may be restricted to
   the application that initially did set up the FlexE Client.

7.2.3.  LSP setup with non-configured FlexE infrastructure

   This example also refers to Figure 4 as different from the earlier
   example no FlexE Group or FlexE Client configuration is done prior to
   the first request for an MPLS LSP over the FlexE infrastructure.

   To make the set up of LSPs in a FlexE network where no FlexE Groups
   or FlexE Clients have been configured two conditions need to be
   fulfilled.  First an out of band signaling channel must be available.
   Second the FlexE Capabilities must be announced in to the IGP and/or
   centralized controller.

   If these two conditions are fulfilled, the set up of an MPLS LSP
   progress pretty much as in the partially configured network.  The
   difference is that the set up of both the FlexE Group and FlexE
   Client are triggered by the request to set up an MPLS LSP.

   As in the partially configured case FlexE Clients can be announced
   into the routing system in two different modes, either they are
   generally availble.  It or they are reserved for the applications
   that first established them.

7.2.4.  Packet Label Switching Data Plane

   This section discusses how the FlexE LSP data plane works.  In
   general it can be said that the interface offered by the FlexE Shim
   and the FlexE client is equivalent to the interface offered by the
   Ethernet MAC.

   Figure 5 below illustrates the FlexE packet switching data plane
   procedures.





Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 18]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


            R1                         R3                        R4
       .............         ......................          ...........
       . +-------+ .         . +----------------+ .          . +-----+ .
       . |  LSP  | .         . | LSP  \  / LSP  | .          . | LSP | .
       . |   a   | .         . |  a    \/   b   | .          . |  b  | .
       . +-------+ .         . +----------------+ .          . +-----+ .
       . |  ETH  | .         . | ETH |    | ETH | .          . | ETH | .
       . |  i/f  | .         . | i/f |    | i/f | .          . | i/f | .
       . +-------+ .         . +-----+    +-----+ .          . +-----+ .
       . | FlexE | .         . |FlexE|    |FlexE| .          . |FlexE| .
       . | trsp  | .         . |trsp |    |trsp | .          . |trsp | .
       . +---+---+ .         . +--+--+    +--+--+ .          . +--+--+ .
       ......|......         .....^..........|.....          .....^.....
             |                    |          |                    |
             +--------------------+          +--------------------+


                    Figure 5: LSP over FlexE Data Plane

   The data plane processes packets like this:

   o  The LSP encapsulating and forawrding function in node R1 receives
      a packet that needs to be encapsulated as an MPLS packet with the
      label "a".  The label "a" is used to figure out which FlexE
      emulated Ethernet interfaces the label encapsulated packet need to
      be forwarded over.

   o  The Ethernet interfaces, by means of FlexE transport, forwards the
      packet to node R3.  Node R3 swaps the label "a" to label "b" and
      uses "b" to decide over which interface to send the packet.

   o  Node R3 forwards the packet to node R, which terminates the LSP.

   Sending MPLS encapsulated packets over a FlexE Client is similar to
   send them over an Ethernet 802.1 interface.  The critical differences
   are:

   o  FlexE channelized sub-interfaces guarantee a deterministic
      bandwidth for an LSP.

   o  When a application that originally establish a FlexE Client
      reserve it for use by that application only, it is possible to
      create uninfringeable bandwidth end-to-end for an MPLS LSP.

   o  FlexE infrastructure allows for creating very large end to end
      bandwidth





Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 19]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


8.  Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM)

   To be added in a later version.

9.  Acknowledgements

10.  IANA Considerations

   This memo includes no request to IANA.

   Note to the RFC Editor: This section should be removed before
   publishing.

11.  Security Considerations

   To be added in a later version.

12.  Contributors

   Khuzema Pithewan, Infinera Corp, kpithewan@infinera.com

   Fatai Zhang, Huawei, zhangfatai@huawei.com

   Jie Dong, Huawei, jie.dong@huawei.com

   Zongpeng Du, Huawei, duzongpeng@huawei.com

   Xian Zhang, Huawei, zhang.xian@huawei.com

   James Huang, Huawei, james.huang@huawei.com

   Qiwen Zhong, Huawei, zhongqiwen@huawei.com

   Yongqing Zhu China Telecom zhuyq@gsta.com

   Huanan Chen China Telecom chenhuanan@gsta.com

13.  References

13.1.  Normative References

   [G.709]    ITU, "Optical Transport Network Interfaces
              (http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-G.709-201606-P/en)", July
              2016.







Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 20]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   [G.798]    ITU, "Characteristics of optical transport network
              hierarchy equipment functional blocks
              (http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-G.798-201212-I/en)",
              February 2014.

   [G.8021]   ITU, "Characteristics of Ethernet transport network
              equipment functional blocks", November 2016.

   [G.872]    ITU, "Architecture of optical transport networks", January
              2017.

   [OIFFLEXE1]
              OIF, "FLex Ethernet Implementation Agreement Version 1.0
              (OIF-FLEXE-01.0)", March 2016.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.

13.2.  Informative References

   [RFC3209]  Awduche, D., Berger, L., Gan, D., Li, T., Srinivasan, V.,
              and G. Swallow, "RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP
              Tunnels", RFC 3209, DOI 10.17487/RFC3209, December 2001,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3209>.

   [RFC4203]  Kompella, K., Ed. and Y. Rekhter, Ed., "OSPF Extensions in
              Support of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
              (GMPLS)", RFC 4203, DOI 10.17487/RFC4203, October 2005,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4203>.

   [RFC4204]  Lang, J., Ed., "Link Management Protocol (LMP)", RFC 4204,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC4204, October 2005,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4204>.

   [RFC5305]  Li, T. and H. Smit, "IS-IS Extensions for Traffic
              Engineering", RFC 5305, DOI 10.17487/RFC5305, October
              2008, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5305>.

   [RFC5440]  Vasseur, JP., Ed. and JL. Le Roux, Ed., "Path Computation
              Element (PCE) Communication Protocol (PCEP)", RFC 5440,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC5440, March 2009,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5440>.







Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 21]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   [RFC7752]  Gredler, H., Ed., Medved, J., Previdi, S., Farrel, A., and
              S. Ray, "North-Bound Distribution of Link-State and
              Traffic Engineering (TE) Information Using BGP", RFC 7752,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC7752, March 2016,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7752>.

Authors' Addresses

   Iftekhar Hussain
   Infinera Corp
   169 Java Drive
   Sunnyvale, CA  94089
   USA

   Email: IHussain@infinera.com


   Radha Valiveti
   Infinera Corp
   169 Java Drive
   Sunnyvale, CA  94089
   USA

   Email: rvaliveti@infinera.com


   Qilei Wang
   ZTE
   Nanjing
   CN

   Email: wang.qilei@zte.com.cn


   Loa Andersson
   Huawei
   Stockholm
   Sweden

   Email: loa@pi.nu


   Mach Chen
   Huawei
   CN

   Email: mach.chen@huawei.com




Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 22]


Internet-Draft              FlexE Extensions               November 2018


   Haomian Zheng
   Huawei
   CN

   Email: zhenghaomian@huawei.com














































Hussain, et al.           Expires May 11, 2019                 [Page 23]


Html markup produced by rfcmarkup 1.128b, available from https://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcmarkup/